ABORIGINAL ART & CULTURE

The way we learn

In the Milingimbi Art and Culture Centre Joyce Naliyabu talks about passing on weaving techniques from generation to generation.

"The 2014 Darwin Aboriginal Art Fair demonstrated the demand for these objects generating significant sales for the weavers"

Weaving skills are strong in the region and many skilled weavers are producing bags, baskets, fish traps, mats and skirts in both traditional and contemporary forms.

In the old days weaving techniques were an important part of Yolngu material culture because the objects produced had important and practical functions. Today this still continues and baskets, mats, fish traps and so on are still used as they have always been.

Joyce and husband and cultural advisor Raymond (below)

Today the beauty of many of these objects is also recognised outside of the Aboriginal world and this means that these woven objects, the bags, baskets, mats, fish traps and skirts are sought after by collectors and art museums around the world.

The 2014 Darwin Aboriginal Art Fair demonstrated the demand for these objects generating significant sales for the weavers from the Milingimbi Art and Culture Centre.

Happily two of the art centre’s woven objects are now in the Creative cowboy films art collection. Here is the link to the Milingimbi Art and Culture Centre Facebook page.

SUBJECT: Aboriginal art and culture / Yolngu / Arnhem Land / Weaving / Learning / Milingimbi